September 2015: Library Newsletter by Vi Lovejoy

cropped-cropped-chetcoBanner1School has begun again, we have experienced some lovely rain and the library is ready to begin children’s programs again also. Linda Mulvany, the children’s librarian, announces that the Wednesday Storytime for pre-school children is held each week at 10:30 a.m. with the following schedule: September 2, “Bath Time Fun;” September 9, “Back to School Tales;” September 16, “How Did Your Garden Grow?;” September 23, “Dinosaur Dramas;” and September 30, “Silly Stories” — you will be surprised!

After School Arts and Crafts for grades 1 – 6 are held on Tuesdays from 4 – 5 p.m. We start the first week on September 22 doing wacky construction. Come see what you can create out of all sorts of strange building materials. On September 29, we will be doing leaf prints and you can bring your own leaves if you like. Check here every month for special events. October will bring a special evening story time.

Washington State University’s David James uses tags to track monarch butterfly migration through the Pacific Northwest. We are excited and honored to be included in this year’s “WSU’s Western Monarch Tracking” program. The monarchs on display in the library have been hand-raised from eggs laid on milkweed plants in Oregon by Vicki Mion and Aleece Townsend. These monarchs will be tagged upon release and may prove to be of use in tracking the Western Monarch Migration. Monarchs will migrate south from Canada, Washington state, Oregon and Northern California to spend the winter in central California. Some of them may go as far south as San Diego and Baja California. If you would like to encourage monarchs to visit your garden, provide pesticide-free flowers, especially milkweed. You may get more information from Vicki Mion at vickimion@gmail.com.

Banned Books Week, September 27 – October 3, 2015, is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. It highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular. By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read. Visit the library and check out our display of books some wanted to be banned.

The next two programs in the “Gardening & Community” series will be on Saturday, September 19, at 10:00 a.m. “Create Your Own Landscape With Plants You Propagate” with Carol Hobbs. On Saturday, October 3, at 10:00 a.m. “Landscaping Ideas for the Fall” and information about the Master Gardener Program with Scott Thiemann. Programs are free and open to all interested members of the community and are sponsored by OSU Extension/Master Gardeners and Friends of the Chetco Community Public Library.

Some of the new books of fiction added to the collection are:

Silver Linings, by Debbie Macomber. Jo Marie, keeper of the Rose Harbor Inn, and two guests deal with trouble in relationships.

Circling The Sun, by Paula Mclain. A novel by the author of “The Paris Wife” about Beryl Markham, a horse trainer and aviatrix who was raised in Kenya.

In A Dark, Dark Wood, by Ruth Ware. A crime writer attends a party in a cabin in the woods and is pulled back into the past, with frightening results.

The Marriage of Opposites, by Alice Hoffman. The fictionalized life of Rachel Pomie, a 19th-century Jewish woman on the island of St. Thomas, whose son Camille Pissaro became a leading Impressionist painter.

Devil’s Bridge, by Linda Fairstein. In the 17th Alexandra Cooper thriller, Coop is kidnapped and the N.Y.P.D. homicide detective Mike Chapman searches for her.

Added to the non-fiction collection are:

Barbarian Days, by William Finnegan. A surfing chronicle and memoir by a New Yorker writer.

Voices In the Ocean, by Susan Casey. The study of dolphins: research, cultural significance, threats.

The Brookings-Harbor Garden Club has also presented four new gardening books to add to that section. They are:

Attracting Beneficial Bugs To Your Garden: A Natural Approach to Pest Control, by Jessica Walliser.

The Indestructible Houseplant: 200 Beautiful Plants That Everyone Can Grow, by Tovah Martin.

The Gardener’s Guide to Weather and Climate, by Michael Allaby.

Hellstrip Gardening: Creating a Paradise Between the Sidewalk and the Curb, by Evelyn Hadden. Here I will add a comment of my own that this book although it focuses on sidewalk/curb plantings, it also describes many plants that will work in dry, hot sand or clay soils. In our area we have a lot of this type of ground. The many unusual answers to making these areas into something pleasant to look at and easy to attain make it well worth your time in reading it.

In observance of Labor Day, Monday, September 7, the library will be closed. It will reopen at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, September 8, 2015.

September 1, 2015

Vi Lovejoy