November Newsletter by Vi Lovejoy

cropped-cropped-cropped-chetcoBanner1.jpgThis month the Chetco Community Public Library begins offering another digital service. In addition to Library2Go, which allows patrons to download ebooks and audiobooks, and Zinio, which allows patrons to download magazines, patrons can now access Hoopla. With Hoopla you can instantly borrow free digital movies, music, ebooks, audiobooks and more, 24/7 with your library card. You may register at hoopladigital.com or through the link on the library’s website, chetcolibrary.org.

The annual Friends of the Library Holiday Book Sale will begin on Thursday, November 12, from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Hours on Friday, November 13, and Saturday, November 14, are also from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. On Sunday, November 15, the sale will be open from 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. with the remaining books available for $2.00 per bag. Please stop in for some good book finds while you are out during the Community Holiday Bazaar held each year in November.

Linda Mulvany, children’s librarian, announces that in November because of the book sale there will be no children’s Story Time until Wednesday, November 25, with the subject, “Feasts,” at 10:30 a.m. The same holds true for the Tuesday Afterschool crafts program. On Tuesday, November 24, from 4:00 – 5:00 p.m., the children will be “Making Turkeys”.

We have a new teen book group that will be meeting the first Monday of the month to read and write. There will be an organizational meeting with games and food on November 9 from 4:00-5:00.

The December Book Discussion Group meeting will be December 7 from 4:00-5:00 p.m. The book chosen for November is Gone Girlby Gillian Flynn.

On November 21 the library will be participating in International Games Day. From 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. We will be hosting video games, board games, card games and more. If you would like to bring your favorite game and host a table please contact Linda. More information to come.

The library would like to start a monthly Lego club. Anybody have any old boxes of Legos hanging out in the basement? Bring them by the library and they will be put to good use.

Some of the new fiction books added to the collection are:

Rogue Lawyer, by John Grisham. The attorney Sebastian Rudd is a “lone” gunman who hates injustice and the system and defends unpopular clients.

See Me, by Nicholas Sparks. Two lovers are threatened by secrets from the past.

The Survivor, by Vince Flynn and Kyle Mills. The counter terrorism operative Mitch Rapp must control the damage from a leak of C.I.A. documents. Mills finished the book for Flynn, who died in 2013.

Career of Evil, by Robert Galbraith.  In the third novel about the private investigative team of Cormoran Strike and Robin Ellacott, the pair pursue a psychotic stalker; by J.K. Rowling, writing pseudonymously.

The Lake House, by Kate Morton. A London detective investigating a missing-persons case becomes curious about an unsolved 1933 kidnapping in Cornwall.

Additions to the non-fiction section include:

Killing Reagan, by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. The host of “The O’Reilly Factor” recounts the events surrounding the attempted assassination of President Reagan in 1981.

The Last of the President’s Men, by Bob Woodward. More revelations from the Nixon White House, based on documents supplied by Alexander Butterfield, the aide who disclosed Nixon’s taping system.

A Common Struggle, by Patrick J. Kennedy and Stephen Fried. The former Rhode Island representative, the son of Senator Ted Kennedy, describes his troubles with bipolar disorder and addiction and his subsequent advocacy for mental health care and research.

Furiously Happy, by Jenny Lawson.  The humorous treatment of the author’s life with depression and anxiety disorder.

A number of gardening books written for younger children have been added to the children’s collection.  If you have young people becoming interested in gardening, you may wish to check out some of these new titles:

Touch a Butterfly: Wildlife Gardening with Kids, by April Pulley Sayre.

Gardening Lab For Kids: 52 Fun Experiments to Learn, Grow, Harvest, Make, Play and Enjoy Your Garden, by Renata Fossen Brown.

Square Foot Gardening With Kids, by Mel Bartholomew.

Kids’ Container Gardening, by Cindy Krezel.

Garden To Table: a Kid’s Guide to Planting, Growing, and Preparing Food, by Katherine Hengel.

There will be no art display in the large meeting room this month due to the Book Sale. In the Lobby Display Case, Stuart Watkins of Brookings has an educational display entitled, “Magnetic Recording Heads for Hard Disk Drives.” Stuart was employed as a Test Engineer in this field until his retirement.

November closures of the Library will be on Wednesday, November 11, in observance of Veterans Day. Thanksgiving closures will be on Wednesday, November 25, open 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. only, and closed on Thursday, November 26 and Friday, November 27. The library will reopen with regular hours on Saturday, November 28, 2015.

Get Your Paintbrush Ready: The Painted & Decorated Pumpkin Contest is Almost Here!

Pumpkin ContestIt’s time for our annual Painted & Decorated Pumpkin Contest! This is a contest for artists of all ages. Prizes will be rewarded for the “Most Creative” pumpkins in four age groups: children 5 and younger; children ages 6 – 11; youth ages 12 – 17; and adults 18 and over. While you are designing your pumpkin, please keep in mind that pumpkins that have been carved or have pierced shells will not be accepted. 

We are excited to see this year’s spooky, silly, and sensational creations! Pumpkins may be delivered to the library between Wednesday, October 21st, and Monday, October 26th. Judging will take place on Tuesday, October 27th, and pumpkins may be picked up beginning Friday, October 30th. 

October 2015: Library Newsletter by Vi Lovejoy

cropped-cropped-cropped-chetcoBanner1.jpgOctober is here and the time of the goblins is quickly approaching so Linda Mulvany, chidren’s librarian, announces the activities for children planned for this month. The Storytime program which is held on Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. will have the programs as follows:  October 7, “Chickens”; on October 14, “How Do Animals Eat?”; October 21, Miss Sallie tells stories; and on October 28, “Pumpkin Tales.” This is for pre-school children and their parents or guardians.

For children in grades 4 – 6, there are after school craft programs held on Tuesdays from 4 – 5 p.m. This month’s crafts will be “Treasure Boxes” on October 6; “Stick Puppets” alligators, dragons, and… on October 13; “Spiders and Spider Webs” on October 20 and ending with “Masks” on October 27.

The annual Halloween Ghost Stories night will be held on Friday, October 23, from 7-8 p.m. Kids of all ages are invited to come in costume. There will be refreshments and a special guest, Dan Rotterman, will make us shiver (just a little) with the stories he will tell.

The annual Painted and/or Decorated Pumpkin Contest also takes place this month. Prizes will be rewarded for the “Most Creative” pumpkins in four age groups: children 5 and  younger; children ages 6  – 11; youth ages 12 – 17; and adults 18 and over. Pumpkins may be delivered to the library between Wednesday, October 21 and Monday, October 26. Judging will take place on Tuesday, October 27, and pumpkins may be picked up beginning Friday, October 30. Pumpkins that have been carved or have pierced shells will not be accepted.  For more information, call the library at 541-469-7738.

If you have children interested in what gardening is all about, you might like to know about a new project being proposed by the OSU Extension Master Gardeners. It is aimed at getting more young folks into gardening. It will be called “Seeds of Learning: Beginning Gardening” and on Saturday, October 10, at 10:00 a.m. a meeting will be held in the large meeting room of the Chetco Community Public Library. It will give families, with children ages 8 – 12, information about the program. A minimum of eight students will be required in order to go forward with this project. The program is planned to show children the how and why of planting seeds and how beneficial it can be to grow one’s own food. In the spring, instructors will demonstrate how to build raised beds across the street from the library on the Annex property. Please bring your children to the October 10 meeting where there will be some seeds to plant in 6-pack containers and also some plants already growing to work with. This will show them some of what they will be learning about in the workshop when it is started. For pre-registration call the library at 541-469-7738.

The final two programs in the Gardening and Community series will be held this month. On Saturday, October 3, at 10:00 a.m. Scott Thiemann will be presenting landscaping ideas for the fall and information about the Curry County Master Gardener Program run through OSU Extension Services.

On Saturday, October 17, Debianne Harpole will tell you how you can use Fall harvest vegetables to enhance your health and make meal time a delight. She’ll discuss how nutrients in fall vegetables can be used in cooking and as snacks to increase health and wellness. Programs are held at 10:00 a.m. in the large meeting room. Programs are free and everyone is welcome.

Some of the new fiction books in the collection are:

Make Me, by Lee Child.  In his 20th appearance, Jack Reacher takes on a missing-persons case.

Devoted In Death, by J.D. Robb. Lt. Eve Dallas races the clock to save a woman kidnapped by a couple on a murder spree; by Nora Roberts, writing pseudonymously.

The End Game, by Catherine Coulter and J.T. Ellison. The F.B.I. agent Nicholas Drummond and his partner, Mike Caine, investigate a violent environmental group with the help of the C.I.A. and Mossad.

The Scam, by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg.  The F.B.I. agent Kate O’Hare and her con man partner, Nicholas Fox, pose as gamblers in order to bring down a casino magnate involved in money laundering.

The Solomon Curse, by Clive Cussler and Russell Blake. The wealthy couple Sam and Remi  Fargo investigate a dangerous legend in the Solomon Islands.

Non-fiction additions are:

Last Night in the OR: A Transplant Surgeon’s Odyssey, by Bud Shaw.

Voices In The Ocean: A  Journey Into The Wild and Haunting World of Dolphins, by Susan Casey, author of  The Wave.

Smokejumper: a Memoir by One of America’s Most Select Airborne Firefighters, by Jason A. Ramos.

81 Days Below Zero; The Incredible Survival Story of a World War II Pilot in Alaska’s Frozen Wilderness, by Brian Murphy.

For the indoor plant gardeners of the community, we have a new book by Tovah Martin, The Indestructible Houseplant. Two hundred beautiful plants and  unusual containers with interesting companion plants in them are shown or listed  This is another donation from the Brookings-Harbor Garden Club.

This month on display in the lobby showcase are boxes created and collected by Dr. Fillmore Earney. Also in the lobby on display, there is a quilt, “Little Star”, created by members of the Azalea Quilt Guild. Tickets for a chance to win the quilt are available at “By My Hand” located on Chetco Avenue. The drawing will be held during the Azalea Festival in May 2016.

Please note that the Library will close at 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 14, 2015, for a staff meeting.

September 28, 2015
Vi Lovejoy

After School Arts and Crafts Returns September 22nd!

Arts and Crafts DioramaAfter School Arts and Crafts will resume at the library September 22 from 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm.

Kids in grades one through six are invited to attend this art-centered after school program. Every week we will read a story and have two or three fun and intriguing art or craft activities. This is a free class, open to all in grades one through six. This class meets most Tuesdays during the school year.

 

Arts and Crafts Shell ArtThis first week’s activity theme will be Wacky Constructions—come see what you might decide to build out of piles of fun materials! Activity themes are announced in advance and can be found on our Library Calendar, which is also available in print at the front desk. We hope to see you there!

September 2015: Library Newsletter by Vi Lovejoy

cropped-cropped-chetcoBanner1School has begun again, we have experienced some lovely rain and the library is ready to begin children’s programs again also. Linda Mulvany, the children’s librarian, announces that the Wednesday Storytime for pre-school children is held each week at 10:30 a.m. with the following schedule: September 2, “Bath Time Fun;” September 9, “Back to School Tales;” September 16, “How Did Your Garden Grow?;” September 23, “Dinosaur Dramas;” and September 30, “Silly Stories” — you will be surprised!

After School Arts and Crafts for grades 1 – 6 are held on Tuesdays from 4 – 5 p.m. We start the first week on September 22 doing wacky construction. Come see what you can create out of all sorts of strange building materials. On September 29, we will be doing leaf prints and you can bring your own leaves if you like. Check here every month for special events. October will bring a special evening story time.

Washington State University’s David James uses tags to track monarch butterfly migration through the Pacific Northwest. We are excited and honored to be included in this year’s “WSU’s Western Monarch Tracking” program. The monarchs on display in the library have been hand-raised from eggs laid on milkweed plants in Oregon by Vicki Mion and Aleece Townsend. These monarchs will be tagged upon release and may prove to be of use in tracking the Western Monarch Migration. Monarchs will migrate south from Canada, Washington state, Oregon and Northern California to spend the winter in central California. Some of them may go as far south as San Diego and Baja California. If you would like to encourage monarchs to visit your garden, provide pesticide-free flowers, especially milkweed. You may get more information from Vicki Mion at vickimion@gmail.com.

Banned Books Week, September 27 – October 3, 2015, is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. It highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular. By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read. Visit the library and check out our display of books some wanted to be banned.

The next two programs in the “Gardening & Community” series will be on Saturday, September 19, at 10:00 a.m. “Create Your Own Landscape With Plants You Propagate” with Carol Hobbs. On Saturday, October 3, at 10:00 a.m. “Landscaping Ideas for the Fall” and information about the Master Gardener Program with Scott Thiemann. Programs are free and open to all interested members of the community and are sponsored by OSU Extension/Master Gardeners and Friends of the Chetco Community Public Library.

Some of the new books of fiction added to the collection are:

Silver Linings, by Debbie Macomber. Jo Marie, keeper of the Rose Harbor Inn, and two guests deal with trouble in relationships.

Circling The Sun, by Paula Mclain. A novel by the author of “The Paris Wife” about Beryl Markham, a horse trainer and aviatrix who was raised in Kenya.

In A Dark, Dark Wood, by Ruth Ware. A crime writer attends a party in a cabin in the woods and is pulled back into the past, with frightening results.

The Marriage of Opposites, by Alice Hoffman. The fictionalized life of Rachel Pomie, a 19th-century Jewish woman on the island of St. Thomas, whose son Camille Pissaro became a leading Impressionist painter.

Devil’s Bridge, by Linda Fairstein. In the 17th Alexandra Cooper thriller, Coop is kidnapped and the N.Y.P.D. homicide detective Mike Chapman searches for her.

Added to the non-fiction collection are:

Barbarian Days, by William Finnegan. A surfing chronicle and memoir by a New Yorker writer.

Voices In the Ocean, by Susan Casey. The study of dolphins: research, cultural significance, threats.

The Brookings-Harbor Garden Club has also presented four new gardening books to add to that section. They are:

Attracting Beneficial Bugs To Your Garden: A Natural Approach to Pest Control, by Jessica Walliser.

The Indestructible Houseplant: 200 Beautiful Plants That Everyone Can Grow, by Tovah Martin.

The Gardener’s Guide to Weather and Climate, by Michael Allaby.

Hellstrip Gardening: Creating a Paradise Between the Sidewalk and the Curb, by Evelyn Hadden. Here I will add a comment of my own that this book although it focuses on sidewalk/curb plantings, it also describes many plants that will work in dry, hot sand or clay soils. In our area we have a lot of this type of ground. The many unusual answers to making these areas into something pleasant to look at and easy to attain make it well worth your time in reading it.

In observance of Labor Day, Monday, September 7, the library will be closed. It will reopen at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, September 8, 2015.

September 1, 2015

Vi Lovejoy

July 28: A Performance by Folksinger Adam Miller

Adam MillerJoin us July 28th at 5:00 p.m. for a special performance by Adam Miller! This event for children is FREE to attend and will take place in the library’s large meeting room.

One of the premier autoharpists in the world, Adam Miller is a renowned American folksinger and natural-born storyteller.  An accomplished folklorist, historian, musicologist, and song-collector, he has amassed a remarkable repertoire of over 5,000 songs.  Miller accompanies his rich, resonant baritone voice with lively finger-picking acoustic guitar and stunningly beautiful autoharp melodies.  A masterful entertainer who never fails to get his audience singing along, he has distinguished himself as one of the great interpreters of American folktales and folksongs, and as a performer who appeals to audiences of all ages.

In a contemporary musical landscape peopled with singer-songwriters and their often short-lived offerings, Miller’s time-honored traditional folksongs and ballads are a breath of fresh air.  His songs evoke a by-gone time when entertainment was homemade.  Spellbinding his audience with his mastery of the art of storytelling, he skillfully interweaves folksongs and the stories behind them with the elegance of a documentary filmmaker.

Traveling 70,000 miles each year, this 21st-century troubadour has performed in concert halls from the Everglades to the Arctic Circle.  Over 1,000,000 students have attended his “Singing Through History” school assembly programs.

Miller’s folksongs and ballads are the songs of America’s heritage; a window into the soul of our nation in its youth.  “I have always had a great interest in how folksongs travel through history, and how history travels through folksongs,” he explains.

A performer who enlightens as well as entertains, Miller points out fascinating connections between events in history and the songs that survived them.  And like radio’s Paul Harvey, he manages to give you “the rest of the story” — providing the often surprising provenance of seemingly innocuous folksongs.His numerous appearances at the Walnut Valley Bluegrass Festival, the Tumbleweed Music Festival, the California Traditional Music Society’s Summer Solstice Festival, and the Kentucky Music Weekend have made him a national favorite.

Coming June 26th: Meet Reptiles Up Close with International Reptile Rescue!

On June 26th, children are invited to learn about turtles and tortoises with International Reptile Rescue! In addition to an educational presentation, children will get to meet a variety of reptiles and insects, including Feather Boa the snake, Larry the lizard, Teresa Tarantula, Scarlet Scorpion, and many more! Children who attend will also receive a reptile necklace, as well as turtle coloring pages.

The presentation starts at 1:00 p.m. in the large meeting room and will last for approximately one hour. This event does not require pre-registration and is open to the public. For more information, please call Linda at (541) 469-7738.

About Interational Reptile Rescue

Operating since the 1970’s, International Reptile Rescue, formerly known as Hart’s Reptile World, is a rescue agency and educational group based in Canby, Oregon. The group’s goal is to educate young people about the “not-so-scary” aspects of reptiles, to help families determine which reptiles do and do not make good pets, and to highlight conservation. To learn more about International Reptile Rescue, please visit hartsreptileworld.com

Dragon Theater Puppets Returns to the Library July 9th!

DragonTheaterPuppetsWe are excited to announce the return of Dragon Theater Puppets for a special Summer Reading Program event! This year, Dragon Theater will be presenting “Home Grown Heroes,” a special performance that teaches kids the values of creativity and teamwork, stressing the importance of the everyday heroes in our lives. After the show, children will have the opportunity to make their own superheroes.

This event takes place on Thursday, July 9th, at 2:00 pm in the large meeting room. This event will last approximately one hour. Children of all ages are invited, and this event is free for the public to attend.

 

Summer Programs for Teens

This summer the library is offering a creative workshop for teens. The workshop is free but registration is required to participate.

Personalized Journals: July 8th, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

Teens are invited to personalize a journal with their favorite quotes and images using multimedia collage. Journals will be provided, although students are welcome to bring their own. Students must register for this workshop by Wednesday, June 24th.